Senior gals with senior horses

Topic for older horses and older riders
demi
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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby demi » Wed Oct 21, 2015 5:17 am

Hello Woost, nice to hear about you. I love your big old paint. We had a paint with a blue eye for 14 years. We loved him so much, we always thought of his blue eye as a jewel.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby Josette » Wed Oct 21, 2015 10:45 am

I'm loving these stories and photos - so happy that I recognize so many of the user names here again. I'm still trying to figure out how to display photos from my Chromebook. Don't hold your breath but maybe I can figure it out soon.... I've re-sized but continue to see error that file is too large when I append it.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Wed Oct 21, 2015 1:57 pm

Woost2 wrote:
Duke-a-licious is just a hoot. He can be a bit of an oaf but we have worked things out. The owner didn't really want me to get him going on treats, but I felt the need for a connection. Still, don't need a horse that big getting pushy/grabby. So I googled and read a suggestion of feeding by hand only when the horse turns his head away. He learned that in about 30 seconds. He gets nothing if me mugs me. He turns his head all the way to the right and then looks back at me out of the corner of his left (blue) eye. I LOL. ""See ... I'm doing it ..."


That's the part I love about treat training: that they're so incredibly engaged. I'm sloppy about the mugging because no one else handles my horses so I don't feel the need to make sure they don't mug others, so mine are all mugging fools. If they get too pushy I'll start shaping a behavior they can't do and mug at the same time, so I eventually get rid of most of the mugging, but I can see that if I'd made that a priority from the beginning that it would have been possible to avoid it altogether.

My dh doesn't treat train and it didn't take any of mine long to figure that out. Even the worst of my muggers don't bother to show him their tricks because they know that he doesn't have any cookies so it's a waste of time to try to "operate" him.

Not sure what winter is going to bring. He's on pasture board but they actually live in a series of dirt paddocks in the winter. With run-in roof. Once deer season starts. Just taking it month by month.


How fortunate that you've found a horse that suits you *and* will go out by himself! That isn't always easy to find.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Wed Oct 21, 2015 2:01 pm

demi wrote:Kande, I have often thought about how you video yourself, but I have trouble seeing your rides because you can't zoom. My older eyeballs need close up stuff. I am thinking about some of the sports cams...


Thanks for the feedback, as I thought they were pretty easy to see. But that may just be because I see the originals, before youtube compresses them?

I do only post the parts that are closest to the camera, to try to avoid the "speck in the distance" thing.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Wed Oct 21, 2015 6:11 pm

So here's my preparation for counter canter, so far. I only tried the loop once and realized that I didn't have enough room in the indoor, so moved outside, but then by the time I worked on bending and walk-canter transitions I forgot all about trying the loop again. Story of my life. :-)

After I thought about it I did realize that I needed to start with a much more shallow loop. So my plan for next time is to move off the wall for a couple of strides and then try to yield back out.

I'm coming off the wall by pushing his hindquarters over, so more like a leg yield, or slightly bent half pass, and then my plan was to yield back out to the wall in the same bend. But maybe I should just steer him through a canter loop?

https://youtu.be/LqW0Wu5zj3U

Would also be nice if I could remember to walk off after canter, but old habits die hard!

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby Woost2 » Wed Oct 21, 2015 9:29 pm

kande50 wrote:My dh doesn't treat train and it didn't take any of mine long to figure that out. Even the worst of my muggers don't bother to show him their tricks because they know that he doesn't have any cookies so it's a waste of time to try to "operate" him.


I'm hoping this is the case with the owner and that she hasn't even noticed. Except for the pile of garden reject carrots and windfall apples that have been by his grooming box for the past few months. :lol:

I got going early today and had a repeat of yesterday in the corn stalks. Just a mosey around. It makes my heart sing. So far his only startle response is a bit of a scoot. Honestly, I have an enormous fear of being hurt. Like it is inevitable. *sigh*. I don't have any idea what he is capable of but I'm getting the feeling that some big explosion would be way too much work for Duke.

His hugeness today ...

FullSizeRender_2.jpg
FullSizeRender_2.jpg (187.17 KiB) Viewed 7414 times


When I was putting him back out in the pasture I heard a little whinny from the stalls nearby. Hmm? Generally everyone goes out. Went to look and there is a weanling. All by himself in the barn. WTH? Poor baby. Not making a big fuss. I'll have to find out what is up.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby musical comedy » Wed Oct 21, 2015 9:39 pm

Woost2 wrote: Honestly, I have an enormous fear of being hurt. Like it is inevitable. *sigh*. I don't have any idea what he is capable of but I'm getting the feeling that some big explosion would be way too much work for Duke.
I have a huge fear of getting hurt too. It has always taken me at least one year to get used to a horse to the point that I have an idea how he will react in various situations. Woost, is the corn field the only place you can ride him? I would be careful trotting out there for fear of a horse stumbling on the stalks. Is that a brand new bridle Duke has on?

Woost wrote:When I was putting him back out in the pasture I heard a little whinny from the stalls nearby. Hmm? Generally everyone goes out. Went to look and there is a weanling. All by himself in the barn. WTH? Poor baby. Not making a big fuss. I'll have to find out what is up.
Aaaah, that would make me sad. Perhaps he is on stall rest for an injury? Still not many horses are happy inside alone. Check it out and let us know.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby Woost2 » Thu Oct 22, 2015 2:22 am

I don't know how new the bridle is. It's in good shape. His owner grew up on a boarding stable and is very organized. Bridle goes in a bridle bag. Lead rope gets coiled like the RCMP. Grooming box arranged just so.

We aren't doing any trotting outside yet. He's a clod ... I'm sure he would trip. There is a small indoor and small outdoor but no trails so this is the first we've been able to tiptoe out the driveway, since the corn was cut. I've just recently progressed beyond the adrenalin/stress heart beat at the mounting block. We had a very rocky start there. I just want a forward walk with no oafish reactions. And me still breathing.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Thu Oct 22, 2015 10:14 am

Woost2 wrote:I just want a forward walk with no oafish reactions. And me still breathing.


Haha, when I first get on a new horse I don't even need a forward walk, and in fact, the slower the better until I get to know them. :-)

I've always started my own horses and mules, but we got a new mule for the dh last spring, and after riding her a few times I decided that I really didn't have the energy to put enough trail miles on her before dh startsriding her, so found someone much younger than either of us to do it. She comes once a week and takes Doris out for a trail ride, and it's working perfectly, because I go out with her so I'm trail riding more, too.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Thu Oct 22, 2015 10:18 am

musical comedy wrote:Still not many horses are happy inside alone. Check it out and let us know.


I know people who lock their youngsters in a stall by themselves until they calm down about being alone. I've always been tempted because so many of ours are so herd bound, but haven't because I'm not convinced that it would work long term. I'm sure they'd calm down eventually each time I locked them up, but I think as soon as I turned them out with the herd again they'd become herd bound all over again?

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Thu Oct 22, 2015 8:58 pm

Went out today with expectations to ride. Tacked up lunged at trot in the outdoor. Mildly off still. So lunged briefly both ways just to loosen him up as I think he's only walking in the field. No swelling at all and the wound is suddenly starting to bridge across the top where it's been most problematical, I've had the vet out three times to debride it last one almost three weeks ago. So as always, good news bad news.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby musical comedy » Thu Oct 22, 2015 9:10 pm

westisbest wrote:Went out today with expectations to ride. Tacked up lunged at trot in the outdoor. Mildly off still. So lunged briefly both ways just to loosen him up as I think he's only walking in the field. No swelling at all and the wound is suddenly starting to bridge across the top where it's been most problematical, I've had the vet out three times to debride it last one almost three weeks ago. So as always, good news bad news.

I don't know what bridging means. Is that good or bad? Why do you think he is slightly off? Is it up front? Is it enough to block for?

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Thu Oct 22, 2015 9:32 pm

musical comedy wrote:
westisbest wrote:Went out today with expectations to ride. Tacked up lunged at trot in the outdoor. Mildly off still. So lunged briefly both ways just to loosen him up as I think he's only walking in the field. No swelling at all and the wound is suddenly starting to bridge across the top where it's been most problematical, I've had the vet out three times to debride it last one almost three weeks ago. So as always, good news bad news.

I don't know what bridging means. Is that good or bad? Why do you think he is slightly off? Is it up front? Is it enough to block for?


Bridging as in the wound is trying to close, bridge the gap. First a wound scabs over then the edges slowly start coming together. So it's very encouraging. Oh it's from the kick in the filed MC that apparently happened sometime early in the field turnout. I didn't go out yesterday. It's the right front shoulder, when I lunge him to the left he is very slightly off at the trot. I didn't canter him that way. Going right (right shoulder on inside) he's near perfect, so I did some walk trot brief sets then a bit of canter to loosen his muscles that was it. Weather is lovely. Let him rest it tomorrow, out very early Saturday hopefully fully healed and we have a lesson before my coach leaves for a getaway next Tuesday.. Monday it's going to be below freezing and S N O W .. aghhh.. we almost always have snow before Hallowe'en here.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Fri Oct 23, 2015 11:01 am

westisbest wrote:Let him rest it tomorrow, out very early Saturday hopefully fully healed and we have a lesson before my coach leaves for a getaway next Tuesday.. Monday it's going to be below freezing and S N O W .. aghhh.. we almost always have snow before Hallowe'en here.


If it's okay to lunge him I would think it would be fine to ride him, as that wouldn't likely stress the wound any more than lungeing him, would it?

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby demi » Fri Oct 23, 2015 11:35 am

westisbest wrote:Went out today with expectations to ride. Tacked up lunged at trot in the outdoor. Mildly off still. So lunged briefly both ways just to loosen him up as I think he's only walking in the field. No swelling at all and the wound is suddenly starting to bridge across the top where it's been most problematical, I've had the vet out three times to debride it last one almost three weeks ago. So as always, good news bad news.


Hang in there, Westi.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Fri Oct 23, 2015 3:58 pm

demi wrote:
westisbest wrote:Went out today with expectations to ride. Tacked up lunged at trot in the outdoor. Mildly off still. So lunged briefly both ways just to loosen him up as I think he's only walking in the field. No swelling at all and the wound is suddenly starting to bridge across the top where it's been most problematical, I've had the vet out three times to debride it last one almost three weeks ago. So as always, good news bad news.


Hang in there, Westi.


Thx Demi! Had a good long brain healing sleep last night. I've been completely over faced with problems lately.. Life feels way more challenging than it should at this age. Was panicking as my farrier hadn't responded to a text of over a week ago so resent it yesterday. Heard from him just now with big apologies. G has excellent feet but I am super particular about farriers.. My last one was adequate but then got onto the current guy thru a friend,, he's a recent import lol from the Isle of Man, UK trained with the 4 year apprenticeship that is necessary there. Does a beautiful job G's feet look perfect now to me. I posted in a thread on UDBB about him trotting him out post trim to be sure that all is totally even on the lower surface and several people said well of course. I have found most here don't.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Fri Oct 23, 2015 4:33 pm

kande50 wrote:
westisbest wrote:Let him rest it tomorrow, out very early Saturday hopefully fully healed and we have a lesson before my coach leaves for a getaway next Tuesday.. Monday it's going to be below freezing and S N O W .. aghhh.. we almost always have snow before Hallowe'en here.


If it's okay to lunge him I would think it would be fine to ride him, as that wouldn't likely stress the wound any more than lungeing him, would it?


Kande the "wound" I speak of is the very slow healing surgical wound from surgery last Dec. 4 that has derailed us all year. And yes you are entirely correct.. The vet only gave us the go-ahead to start lungeing and riding mid-August.. Well this vet. Our first med vet ie post surgery as the surgeon didn't follow up said he was good to go back in March.. had returned to our "home" barn from the tbred racing barn that I was in for rehab, did a week of lungeing he got back fitness very quickly started riding then in March and the wound stopped healing and was creating granular tissue that was raising up above the skin margins. That med vet left the practise to go back to Montana, emailed surgeon and he appointed new vet to follow and said that G needed to stay in restricted movement ie small paddock turnout and no lungeing no riding to allow for healing. So that's been the case until August. I've actually only been riding him from September till now. And September I was a weak legged and minded useless thing :)... October has been better. But after making the decision to put him back in the big field last week he sustained a small kick from another horse to his shoulder and he was a bit sore there and stepping short just slightly off. So my coach didn't want to take any chances of making things worse by riding him at this point.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Fri Oct 23, 2015 7:06 pm

westisbest wrote:So my coach didn't want to take any chances of making things worse by riding him at this point.


Holy moly, from Dec to August? That's 9 months!

So now the Dec. 4th surgical scar is all healed up, but this new ding is in the same general area but doesn't affect the old, healed one?

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Fri Oct 23, 2015 10:46 pm

kande50 wrote:
westisbest wrote:So my coach didn't want to take any chances of making things worse by riding him at this point.


Holy moly, from Dec to August? That's 9 months!

So now the Dec. 4th surgical scar is all healed up, but this new ding is in the same general area but doesn't affect the old, healed one?


Yep 9 long months. No, the surgical wound is not healed, Still working on it. The original post surgical area as 4" by 9" it was just awful, a huge big flat open flat wound. They took out a lot of scar tissue, debris, old suture material. It was pretty traumatic to see him like that. It shrunk well the first three months then slowed down as I wrote above.. he lost a lot of weight and didn't shed out well so I had a full blood work up done in June to see if there was any thing off but no all except a slight elevation in white blood cells which was probably due to the stress of the wound. And he had missed some wormings so got that done and he finished shedding and gained weight added extra complete etc. But the slow wound healing is a puzzler. And a huge stressor.. he can't be clipped because I can't blanket as the wound is right on the sternum where the closure sits on a blanket. I have a woman coming mid-Nov to see if she can reconfigure one of his winter blankets. So now he's all teddy bear coated and I have to be careful not to overheat him in work. So yea it's been a very long stressful time.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Sat Oct 24, 2015 9:25 am

westisbest wrote:[So now he's all teddy bear coated and I have to be careful not to overheat him in work. So yea it's been a very long stressful time.


I don't clip, and mine do get very furry in the winter. They started getting their winter coats in Sept and will have much longer, denser coats by February. But I don't work them hard enough in the winter for them to sweat (or at least for the sweat to get to the surface), which isn't difficult because it's cold so they don't sweat easily. On the rare occasions when they exercise themselves into a sweat they don't seem to have any problems with being sweaty, perhaps because by the time they cool off they've dried off quite a bit?

I tried blanketing one of my hard keepers in the winter, but it didn't seem to make any difference to keeping weight on her and only prevented her from growing a heavier coat, so I gave up on that.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Sat Oct 24, 2015 1:32 pm

kande50 wrote:
westisbest wrote:[So now he's all teddy bear coated and I have to be careful not to overheat him in work. So yea it's been a very long stressful time.


I don't clip, and mine do get very furry in the winter. They started getting their winter coats in Sept and will have much longer, denser coats by February. But I don't work them hard enough in the winter for them to sweat (or at least for the sweat to get to the surface), which isn't difficult because it's cold so they don't sweat easily. On the rare occasions when they exercise themselves into a sweat they don't seem to have any problems with being sweaty, perhaps because by the time they cool off they've dried off quite a bit?

I tried blanketing one of my hard keepers in the winter, but it didn't seem to make any difference to keeping weight on her and only prevented her from growing a heavier coat, so I gave up on that.


I have to stay in training minimum two lessons a week to stay in my boarding barn. So he has to work. Not overly hard but work.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Sat Oct 24, 2015 2:40 pm

westisbest wrote:
I have to stay in training minimum two lessons a week to stay in my boarding barn. So he has to work. Not overly hard but work.


Ah yes, that does change the game considerably. What happened while he was laid up? Is that when you took him to the rehab facility? Did they hold a place for you at the boarding barn while he was in rehab? Do you like taking 2 lessons a week, or would you rather not? Can you take two half hour lessons a week, or does it have to be a full hour? It would be very motivating. Did you say that you may be moving to a private barn that's closer to where you live?

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Sat Oct 24, 2015 2:56 pm

kande50 wrote:
westisbest wrote:
I have to stay in training minimum two lessons a week to stay in my boarding barn. So he has to work. Not overly hard but work.


Ah yes, that does change the game considerably. What happened while he was laid up? Is that when you took him to the rehab facility? Did they hold a place for you at the boarding barn while he was in rehab? Do you like taking 2 lessons a week, or would you rather not? Can you take two half hour lessons a week, or does it have to be a full hour? It would be very motivating. Did you say that you may be moving to a private barn that's closer to where you live?


When his chest blew out ie exploded with a huge flap of granulation and infection, he was in full time pasture board. I had given up my box stall as he seemed to need more outside time not to mention the financial stress of coming up with $$ for box stall monthly. So since he was going to need stall rest and there were no stalls at home barn I found the rehab tbred place which is also much closer to home. They were fantastic there in caring for him. They have gone to boarding jumper riders and horses as the racing industry has failed so much. To stay there post rehab I would have had to sign on with one of the three permitted trainers there and since none were likely to be suitable for me I went back to home barn. Actually I was given an ultimatum at home barn in March, they had a stall since there were a bunch going to Cali for the show season. Yes I am happy with the two lessons a week. One would be enough really. I could probably dumb it down to that. And ride more on my own. Ugh, the private barn! Found out yesterday that this may not be happening till June now or later. Was feeling quite despondent after hearing this as the prospect of the long drive, the issues with the boarding barn I'm at are wearing on me. Also the huge financial strain of the box stall.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Sat Oct 24, 2015 3:33 pm

westisbest wrote:To stay there post rehab I would have had to sign on with one of the three permitted trainers there and since none were likely to be suitable for me I went back to home barn. Actually I was given an ultimatum at home barn in March, they had a stall since there were a bunch going to Cali for the show season.


What was the ultimatum at the home barn in March?

Is the board set up so that it includes 2 lessons a week, but it's optional whether you actually take the lessons? Or do they actually want you to take the lessons?

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby musical comedy » Sat Oct 24, 2015 3:38 pm

Westi, let me make sure I have the detail correct.

Rehab barn/Racehorse Barn: Not too far, but need to sign on with trainers that are inappropriate.

Current Boarding Barn: Requires 2 lesson/wk. Has a Stall. Is a 45 minute drive on way.

Potential Private Barn: Is close by, but can't go there until June

Am I correct?

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Sat Oct 24, 2015 3:44 pm

The ultimatum was either go back or pay to hold a stall. So I would have been paying $1800.00 a month for stalls in both places. Clearly no choice but to go back. I board at a H/J barn that we moved to as a dressage group 4 years ago with two trainers after we lost our long time home.. long story all water under the bridge now. So we are kind of second class citizens at best. They the HJ BO's may have had hopes I would lease my guy or let him be used for lessons I was approached about this. But he is no hunter, he jumps "big" and there are no higher level jumpers there, the lower level hunters would not be able to handle him.Younger dressage trainer has more or less left moved her clients to a dedicated dressage barn. So our dressage group and one trainer are a small group left now. If I don't take lessons I'm not supporting my trainer. And then I won't be in the small elite haha... group invited to the new "private" facility which my coach will be running.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Sat Oct 24, 2015 3:49 pm

musical comedy wrote:Westi, let me make sure I have the detail correct.

Rehab barn/Racehorse Barn: Not too far, but need to sign on with trainers that are inappropriate.

Current Boarding Barn: Requires 2 lesson/wk. Has a Stall. Is a 45 minute drive on way.

Potential Private Barn: Is close by, but can't go there until June

Am I correct?


Yes MC you have got it! The current barn is very dodgy on the hay. They do round bales in the field (turnout or fulltime horses) last couple days there was no hay.. my horse was hungry had to sneak extra hay into his stall so he could eat before going back in field.. It's insane. Pasture board is $550.00 a month and there are many days even in bitter cold when they let the hay run out. It's a major source of stress for us. So it was a choice, paddock with small but regular hay meals or out in field where he's happier and moving but risk of injury and worrying about hay supply. He gets about 3 small flakes for his "dinner" and then 2.. supposedly for night feed. Plus a scoop of beet pulp and a scoop of high quality senior feed that I provide for him AM and PM plus his supplements so he's OK for feed. But when they round bale runs out the 24/7 pasture horses (there are about 3 in that field) get distressed and then the herd is not happy leads to more potential incidents..

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Sat Oct 24, 2015 3:52 pm

westisbest wrote:Younger dressage trainer has more or less left moved her clients to a dedicated dressage barn. So our dressage group and one trainer are a small group left now. If I don't take lessons I'm not supporting my trainer. And then I won't be in the small elite haha... group invited to the new "private" facility which my coach will be running.


$1800/month sounds very steep. Does that include the 8 lessons you're expected to take, or are those on top of that? Did you say that the barn has a heated indoor?

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Sat Oct 24, 2015 3:55 pm

kande50 wrote:
westisbest wrote:Younger dressage trainer has more or less left moved her clients to a dedicated dressage barn. So our dressage group and one trainer are a small group left now. If I don't take lessons I'm not supporting my trainer. And then I won't be in the small elite haha... group invited to the new "private" facility which my coach will be running.


$1800/month sounds very steep. Does that include the 8 lessons you're expected to take, or are those on top of that? Did you say that the barn has a heated indoor?


No that would have been double board. I pay $950.00 plus tax of 5% for the stall. It's a beautiful facility new big heated indoor, super clean etc. I pay my coach extra for lessons, she only teaches dressage does her own thing there, has a couple of horses she boards as well. Full training ie 4x a week is $600.00 half training which I am is $342. including tax. These are average rates around here for a good barn and trainer.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby musical comedy » Sat Oct 24, 2015 3:58 pm

The hay situation in all boarding barns is terrible from what I've seen. Hay is a big ticket item and often hard to find. It is so very essential. I would also be frantic about a barn running out of hay.

It's especially hard for someone like you that lives so far away. When I boarded, I was close enough to drive out a couple times a day if necessary and supplement with my own hay.

Westi, do you stay in that part of the county because you have family or a job there?

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Sat Oct 24, 2015 4:04 pm

musical comedy wrote:The hay situation in all boarding barns is terrible from what I've seen. Hay is a big ticket item and often hard to find. It is so very essential. I would also be frantic about a barn running out of hay.

It's especially hard for someone like you that lives so far away. When I boarded, I was close enough to drive out a couple times a day if necessary and supplement with my own hay.

Westi, do you stay in that part of the county because you have family or a job there?


I moved here from Montreal in 1974. Met my exhusband at work three months later. Two years later married, heavily invested in his business (a professional corporate partnership).. my family was all down east in Oakville, Ontario then. Divorced after 20 years family has now all passed away.. my niece and nephew are now here near me. Had some thoughts of relocating to the west coast but for various reasons gave that up. Need to work to live and ride :).. so being here is the best idea. Even with the downturn in the oil industry which has hit hard here, lots of job opportunities.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby musical comedy » Sat Oct 24, 2015 4:05 pm

Full training 4x/week for $600 is a bargain here. Haven't checked lately, but last I knew you couldn't get anyone decent for under 1k a month. Board of 800+ is common here; again, I haven't checked recently.

Quite honestly, I think that is a fair price for boarding IF they are doing it right. Most aren't; they're skimping on hay and bedding.

If I didn't have my own place, I couldn't have a horse now. It's when I hear these kinds of prices that I realize just how poor I am.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Sat Oct 24, 2015 4:12 pm

musical comedy wrote:Full training 4x/week for $600 is a bargain here. Haven't checked lately, but last I knew you couldn't get anyone decent for under 1k a month. Board of 800+ is common here; again, I haven't checked recently.

Quite honestly, I think that is a fair price for boarding IF they are doing it right. Most aren't; they're skimping on hay and bedding.

If I didn't have my own place, I couldn't have a horse now. It's when I hear these kinds of prices that I realize just how poor I am.


You seem incredibly fortunate to me, horse on your own place, indoor.

Sometimes the insanity the illogical freaking insanity of what I'm doing, spending $$ of a 22 year old horse pushing myself physically and emotionally to stay riding, hits me hard. As it has the last couple of days. But when I am actually there it always feels as if there is no other choice. And that just doing the next right thing every day, every week every month will get me thru this.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Sat Oct 24, 2015 4:14 pm

westisbest wrote:These are average rates around here for a good barn and trainer.


That sounds much better than $1800/month, and is probably consistent with what barns in more populated areas near here charge. We're in a more rural area so I think board at an average barn with an unheated indoor is about $500-$600/month. That would include hay, grain, bedding, cleaning the stall, and turnout.

I've never, ever heard of a boarding barn routinely running out of hay. I know that the pasture horses can pick, but most of what people are paying for is food for their horse, so IMO, running out of hay and letting the horses go hungry seems completely unacceptable to me.
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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Sat Oct 24, 2015 4:17 pm

kande50 wrote:
westisbest wrote:These are average rates around here for a good barn and trainer.


That sounds much better than $1800/month, and is probably consistent with what barns in more populated areas charge near here. We're in a more rural area so I think board at an average barn with an unheated indoor is about $500-$600/month. That would include hay, grain, bedding, cleaning the stall, and turnout.

I've never, ever heard of a boarding barn routinely running out of hay. I know that the pasture horses can pick, but most of what people are paying for is food for their horse, so IMO, running out of hay and letting the horses go hungry seems completely unacceptable to me.


I never did either until the last 5 years. I was fortunate to be in a barn for 9 years owned by woman I bought G from who is extremely well funded. No issues ever there..deep straw bedding, lots of hay.. quality was iffy once in while but generally everything was great. So it's been a harsh hard landing when she closed down and we had to go gypsying in the unknown here.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Sat Oct 24, 2015 4:35 pm

westisbest wrote:
Sometimes the insanity the illogical freaking insanity of what I'm doing, spending $$ of a 22 year old horse pushing myself physically and emotionally to stay riding, hits me hard. As it has the last couple of days. But when I am actually there it always feels as if there is no other choice. And that just doing the next right thing every day, every week every month will get me thru this.


I feel the same way. I just get through the bad days because there are always going to be bad days, and I have to get through them to get to the good ones.

I think spending resources on a 22 year old horse that you can ride certainly makes a lot more sense than spending it on a younger one that isn't suitable. I know too many senior riders who spend a lot of time watching someone else ride their fancy (too young for them) horse because they can't ride it themselves, and they wouldn't be in that predicament if they'd just bought an older, less fancy horse that more closely matched their abilities.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Sat Oct 24, 2015 4:38 pm

kande50 wrote:
westisbest wrote:
Sometimes the insanity the illogical freaking insanity of what I'm doing, spending $$ of a 22 year old horse pushing myself physically and emotionally to stay riding, hits me hard. As it has the last couple of days. But when I am actually there it always feels as if there is no other choice. And that just doing the next right thing every day, every week every month will get me thru this.


I feel the same way. I just get through the bad days because there are always going to be bad days, and I have to get through them to get to the good ones.

I think spending resources on a 22 year old horse that you can ride certainly makes a lot more sense than spending it on a younger one that isn't suitable. I know too many senior riders who spend a lot of time watching someone else ride their fancy (too young for them) horse because they can't ride it themselves, and they wouldn't be in that predicament if they'd just bought an older, less fancy horse that more closely matched their abilities.


Yes he's more than enough for me :).. actually for a lot of riders if truth be told.

The sun is out it's warmed up enuf to ride outside. Forward as one german coach used to yell at me! thanks Kande and MC for the ear.. enough moaning now. In 45 minutes I will have that happy certain feeling that yes it's exactly the right thing to do.. hard yes,
but I had many years of ease. Some people never have that.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Sat Oct 24, 2015 5:11 pm

westisbest wrote:
Yes he's more than enough for me :).. actually for a lot of riders if truth be told.


Just because they get older doesn't necessarily mean that they become kids' ponies. :-)
Last edited by kande50 on Sat Oct 24, 2015 5:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby musical comedy » Sat Oct 24, 2015 5:23 pm

kande50 wrote:Just because they get older doesn't necessarily mean that they become kid's' ponies. :-)
LOL. Read this:
http://draftcross.com/we-didnt-say-it/


I

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Sat Oct 24, 2015 5:55 pm

musical comedy wrote:http://draftcross.com/we-didnt-say-it/


Once in awhile I hear about a novice who bought a greenie and it worked out, but most of the time the horse they needed and the horse they bought were two different horses. :-)

Someone I met who was probably in her 60's when she lost her 30 year old trail riding pony let her son talk her into a really quiet 4 year old QH mare. Not sure how many rides she got in before she came off and broke her wrist, but I can't imagine why she let anyone talk her into a 4 year old!

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby demi » Sun Oct 25, 2015 12:25 pm

westisbest wrote:The sun is out it's warmed up enuf to ride outside. Forward as one german coach used to yell at me! thanks Kande and MC for the ear.. enough moaning now. In 45 minutes I will have that happy certain feeling that yes it's exactly the right thing to do.. hard yes,
but I had many years of ease. Some people never have that.


You have my ear (and heart) too, Westi. I hope you had a nice ride in the sun yesterday, and even if you just visited Gali, I hope you both enjoyed each other.
You mentioned that he seemed to have lost his desire (can't remember exactly how you put it) but when you started him back to work he picked up noticeably. I have seen that so many times over the years. Even with very light work, some horses just do better. In my human mind, I think it's as much about the attention they are receiving as it is the work. When I've had to nurse horses back from long illnesses, it has always ended up in a very close bond.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby Josette » Sun Oct 25, 2015 5:20 pm

I have to agree that running out of hay is unacceptable - especially for what you are paying. How critical is it to continue working with a trainer during this rehab period? Is it feasible to find a smaller barn at less cost for a stall, say a smaller indoor with safe turnout arrangement? Like even a private owner who rents out a stall and closer to home. This rehab and healing period is very stressful and he doesn't need an added injury. Plus a trainer insisting on lesson schedule when your horse is not quite ready yet.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby musical comedy » Sun Oct 25, 2015 5:32 pm

Josette wrote:I have to agree that running out of hay is unacceptable - especially for what you are paying. How critical is it to continue working with a trainer during this rehab period? Is it feasible to find a smaller barn at less cost for a stall, say a smaller indoor with safe turnout arrangement? Like even a private owner who rents out a stall and closer to home. This rehab and healing period is very stressful and he doesn't need an added injury. Plus a trainer insisting on lesson schedule when your horse is not quite ready yet.

I don't know what the weather gets like where Westi lives, but as you know Josette, living out in NJ Winter sometimes can get dangerously treacherous. I had my pastures closed off for probabably 3 months. A sheet of ice. That's why I asked Westi about the feasibility of relocating to a place where a horse could have turnout and the fees would be less.

With respect to hay, my neighbor buys those round bales for her retired horses that live out 24/7. She has some big dome type covers over them. Isn't it possible for barn owners to buy many of those round bales, like enough to last a season, and put them out with a cover? That's probably a dumb question, and if so, I apologize. It's just that in some areas if you don't buy hay when it is available, come middle of Winter you can't find any. That is why ever here in NJ, some of the pricey barns have crap hay. They can't buy enough good stuff to last through Winter because they have too many horses to feed. Come February, they are feeding what looks like straw and broom splints.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby Josette » Sun Oct 25, 2015 6:05 pm

Darn I lost my reply. MC - you are totally right about the harsh winters and the need for a heated indoor. A necessary requirement. It is frustrating the strings attached to take lessons in these barns when you are rehabbing an injured horse. The hay situation is maddening - sounds like poor management not to purchase enough hay to get through the winter. Running out of hay is unacceptable and feed junk hay when charging boarder top $$$$ is WRONG too IMO. I feel very bad for owners at the mercy of these boarding training barns.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Sun Oct 25, 2015 6:25 pm

Lost my reply too! Anyway, ran out early today for farrier, misty cold fog everywhere but Mr. Teddy bear was happy as a big clam at the round bale with his buddies. 4 of the 7 in that group are over 20. Couple of youngsters that were testing him at first but it's settled down. I think most horses need that herd interaction I know G has missed it. No situation will ever be perfect. As far as something closer have scoured the countryside near here last four years nothing. It costs over $1.5 million to put a heated decent size indoor up double that for barn and indoor so not many around close to here. Most are jumping barns and don't want you unless you are in training and don't allow dressage trainers in. Queried my coach yesterday she said construction on new place starts November l so she thinks maybe May or earlier we will move. I'm feeling much calmer today have had a lot of stressful stuff last couple of weeks but things are resolving.

No I don't have to stay there of course but leaving now will net me nothing.. I will lose touch with the only friends I have that I enjoy riding with and that ride at my level. My coach is so kind and caring with him and me. I don't think she could ever be replaced. And she won't. Taking him and me out of work even for a few months may be an end game. As in we wouldn't start again. Then we'll be done and I'm not ready for that.

MC our winters are rugged. We are at 3500 ft elevation.. my current barn is near the foothills on the last few miles of the drive you can see the Rockies like a painted backdrop against the sky. Snow can come early usually before Hallowe'en and last thru May. Fields get frozen but rarely icy. And with the super el Nino we are predicted to have a mild dry winter here so hopefully we will make our way thru each month unblanketed. If it's terribly cold like -30 C or lower which we get at least one good long spell of, he will have to stay in or just go out for a few hours.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Sun Oct 25, 2015 6:31 pm

Josette wrote:Darn I lost my reply. MC - you are totally right about the harsh winters and the need for a heated indoor. A necessary requirement. It is frustrating the strings attached to take lessons in these barns when you are rehabbing an injured horse. The hay situation is maddening - sounds like poor management not to purchase enough hay to get through the winter. Running out of hay is unacceptable and feed junk hay when charging boarder top $$$$ is WRONG too IMO. I feel very bad for owners at the mercy of these boarding training barns.


Josette they have the hay. They grow their own which is baled in squares a very good quality and is fed to the indoor horses. They buy a huge number of round bales, altho this year they had to drive two hours south to negotiate a good deal on hay and then still put our board up $50.00 a month to cover hay increase. It's their management of the rounds. There are 2 mare fields and 2 gelding fields, with round bale holders. They let the hay run out then expect the horses to clean up every little peed and pooed on rotten bit of hay on the ground before they put a new one up. So frustrating! but we have complained asked nicely to no avail. And my coach's horses are in those fields too. So at least my horse gets his hay at night regardless along with his extras. I've never encountered this miserly crap before. They had the place for sale for a couple of years but it's off the market now. As the economy here has cratered.
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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Sun Oct 25, 2015 6:37 pm

musical comedy wrote:They can't buy enough good stuff to last through Winter because they have too many horses to feed. Come February, they are feeding what looks like straw and broom splints.


The problem is that in this climate (western Massachusetts) horse hay needs to be stored inside, because the round bales especially are so heavy that they make such good contact with the ground that the moisture gets wicked up into them and rots the whole bottom of the bale. And as the bottom of the bale rots the whole bale often gets musty. So it's either store hay inside, or feed crap hay.

I've noticed that more of the farmers in this area are starting to use plastic wrap on the round bales, which I suspect might be a big improvement because the bottoms of the bales will be more protected from the moisture in the ground.

We sell a lot of round bales in the spring when people run out of hay, which is why part of my indoor is taken up with the extra round bales that won't fit in the hay mow. But hay gets priority over riding space because it helps pay the expenses.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Sun Oct 25, 2015 6:43 pm

All their hay is stored outside.. The rounds come in plastic wrap. Not sure what they use on ground that they are stacked on up in the bale yard. The squares are stacked in a huge pile outside the barn on some kind of ground cover and then tarped. My friend says she will store her hay indoors in the new barn. But she is only having six stalls and maybe 12 horses overall since it's private not commercial so much more manageable. I know I can hold on till we get to the "promised land" lol.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby kande50 » Sun Oct 25, 2015 6:48 pm

westisbest wrote:
No I don't have to stay there of course but leaving now will net me nothing.. I will lose touch with the only friends I have that I enjoy riding with and that ride at my level. My coach is so kind and caring with him and me. I don't think she could ever be replaced. And she won't. Taking him and me out of work even for a few months may be an end game. As in we wouldn't start again. Then we'll be done and I'm not ready for that.


I can understand that, because if I can find a coach that I want to ride with I'm perfectly willing to kick in extra to help support them, because it's not always easy to find a compatible instructor.

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Re: Senior gals with senior horses

Postby westisbest » Sun Oct 25, 2015 6:57 pm

kande50 wrote:
westisbest wrote:
No I don't have to stay there of course but leaving now will net me nothing.. I will lose touch with the only friends I have that I enjoy riding with and that ride at my level. My coach is so kind and caring with him and me. I don't think she could ever be replaced. And she won't. Taking him and me out of work even for a few months may be an end game. As in we wouldn't start again. Then we'll be done and I'm not ready for that.


I can understand that, because if I can find a coach that I want to ride with I'm perfectly willing to kick in extra to help support them, because it's not always easy to find a compatible instructor.


He was a very challenging horse in his younger days. I think he had his share of tough training. In fact I know he did. It's amazing to me that he is so kind, loving and trustworthy after some of that crap. Altho I also think that he is and was the kind that would not allow himself to be really abused. Powerful stallion thru his major formative years. My coach is kind but firm. When we did the disastrous allowing of him to be used for a jumping lesson after he dumped me two years ago, he three strided a four stride on the poor gal that was doing the lesson and jumped her out of the tack right up on his neck. And she was my height! few bunny hops and she was off.. my coach jammed on her helmet, got on him did all the singles and doubles, went in the line, gave him a good "insterberger" half halt he was perfect. Yes ma'am.. :)..


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