Strategies for lateral work

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khall
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Strategies for lateral work

Postby khall » Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:44 am

I've been pondering this thought for a bit. Watching the video Rosie shared with Bliss and her clinic with Cindy Ishoy and my work with my WBs and how they are affected by lateral work and also the riding I did in Spain on the Andalusians and how they differ to ride lateral work with.

I sympathize and understand how Bliss could get behind the leg during the lateral work, my WBs do the same. I've always been taught is to get out of the exercise to refresh the gait, don't keep in the lateral work when they lose the energy and quality of gait. With the more energetic horses, the lateral work is much easier. Riding the Andi's was a breeze compared to the WBs I normally ride. I have to keep my energy up so that my WBs will meet me and mirror that energy. Rip finally now is strong enough to keep his tempo and activity, now I am needing to build power and cadence in his gait both on the straight or curved lines and in lateral work.

I also use lateral work on bended lines often to increase the difficulties of the movement. Some do not agree with this training, but IMO it builds a very strong and supple horse.

So what are your tips for training lateral work?

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby piedmontfields » Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:38 pm

Khall, I agree that lateral work is not the same challenge on the quick supple Andalusian/Lusitano type horses as on TBs or WBs. I would say that I go to lateral work on a less advanced horse with the Iberian body type, as it is part of getting them to release their short backs and connect over the back. I am also a fan of lateral work on circles and curved lines.

At this point with Emi, I would say we use lateral work a few ways:
-As a way to prepare for work in the warm-up (this is usually done at the walk)
-As a strength builder for developing engagement in the trot and canter
-As a exercise for expressing the engagement and power we've cultivated in our work (this is the lateral work that is closest to show quality)

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby Sue B » Fri Jan 26, 2018 4:55 pm

With my Iberian shaped TB, I do a ton of lateral work in the walk . My more recent fav is doing a umber of TOH both directions before setting off into the trot. Really helps get those hocks bending while maintaining a forward attitude. I do some lateral work on the circle but find it difficult to maintain "straightness" without eyes on the ground letting me know when or if he drifts. I can feel the crookedness, but I worry that I'm not recognizing it quickly enough. Hot little round horses like Rudy can be difficult to keep properly attuned to leg aides (forward), and I think that's where lateral work excels. Lateral work also, of course, releases those tight little back back muscles too.

With my wb Tio, I use ly and sf because he is still very green. I use those two primarily to help straighten him and as a side benefit, i often attain more cadence in the trot. The only time I do any lateral work on the circle is to ly out from 15m to 20m (in the trot) and step into canter. He has pretty nice departs naturally, but doing the ly puts more forward into it.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby tlkidding » Fri Jan 26, 2018 7:41 pm

I've been told several times to let the tempo slow down when you are introducing new lateral work. Only hold it for a few steps, get out and refresh, and then try again. But you do sometimes have to let the gait suffer if you are not getting adequate response to a lateral aid. You are affecting the horse's balance by displacing the hips or shoulders and they want to stay in balance so might slow down to feel comfortable.

I think if you have a horse that has a general tendency to get behind the leg, you have to always feel like if you straighten out of the lateral work and put your leg on, will they go? If not, pause in schooling the lateral work and refresh the forward on a straighter line.

I use lateral work in the walk to warm up and then test some of it in the trot and canter. However, we are really working on straightness, so in the areas we are struggling with, I'm not thinking about shoulder in or haunches out, but rather that the left hind and right front in the right lead canter are not carrying correctly and I need to move the shoulders in and counter bend. Then I vary the degrees of each to test the accuracy and strength we are trying to build.

I can tell you that getting stuck on straightness, particularly in the RL canter, has taken a few years to really build the correct strength and is always something I'm testing. So don't forget to check straightness a lot when you are working on lateral work (I'll do them in separate rides so I can get really specific and detailed).

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby piedmontfields » Sat Jan 27, 2018 3:17 pm

tlkidding, I agree that good lateral work is a lot about straightness and have clarity around positioning.

Also, I think it about rideability. That might be an interesting thread in itself.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby khall » Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:16 pm

SueB I like TOH to trot or even canter when appropriate too! Had been one of my go to's with both of my WBs.

tk yes I hear you on straightness. Why I tend to like counter SI or renvere better than SI or HI because I feel they better address straightening issues. I also use counter bend in canter (Rip's is right L too) for straightening him.

A recent lesson I had with a clinician was talking about how lateral work powers the horse up (we were doing specific exercises to get to half steps) but I find with my WBs don't operate that way. I use the lateral work to increase suppleness and flexibility but not for creating power, only activating them i.e. asking for power with energy creates power.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby piedmontfields » Sat Jan 27, 2018 11:16 pm

shall wrote: A recent lesson I had with a clinician was talking about how lateral work powers the horse up (we were doing specific exercises to get to half steps) but I find with my WBs don't operate that way.


Interesting! I definitely use lateral work to power up my mare. It's a bit of "thou shalt load the hind legs" for us. Maybe it is a type/conformation thing.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby khall » Sun Jan 28, 2018 2:19 pm

What I find is that lateral work will slow the hind leg of the WBs (at least the ones that I own now) very much like what Rosie was having issues with. They are just not that forward or active thinking. Powerful and strong but not forward thinking. I used to not even want to ride in my fenced arena because the fence and smaller area would back Rip off, his sister not as much. So I rode out in the fields as much as I could. I have to activate Rip now with just a click of the tongue but originally was the whip and keep my own energy up so he will match it. Same with his sister. My filly's dam (she was 1/2 TB) was much more forward thinking. I used to call her my ballerina where Rip was my combat boots horse! It has taken time for Rip to develop his suppleness so he can use his strength now. He is an older style WB, big stout with big muscles.

Rip late summer https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid ... =3&theater
What I have found interesting is that with his new found understanding of using his sling properly his whole body has changed. He is slimmer and more stream lined. He used to be this big bulky horse and now his barrel is smaller and his muscles are way more defined. I tried to start a thread but it went no where about how with Rip using his sling now he has narrowed up across his withers.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby musical comedy » Sun Jan 28, 2018 2:41 pm

khall wrote:What I find is that lateral work will slow the hind leg of the WBs (at least the ones that I own now) very much like what Rosie was having issues with. They are just not that forward or active thinking. Powerful and strong but not forward thinking. I used to not even want to ride in my fenced arena because the fence and smaller area would back Rip off, his sister not as much. So I rode out in the fields as much as I could. .
<respectfully snipped> I wrote my comments about lateral work/circles in an earlier thread here and most were not in agreement. Lateral work takes more energy and generally not the strong suit of a non-forwarding-thinking horse. My old guy is much like khalls. Big, old style, big muscled and very powerful, but not the foward thinking light moving ballerina type. I also feel that horses that are wide chested have more difficulty in going foward in half pass. I guess to each his own and what works for some doesn't work for others. I am of the mindset that I will never sacrifice forward/energy to do or even learn a movement. With a horse like mine, I would never consider warming up in walk doing lateral work.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby Chisamba » Sun Jan 28, 2018 3:13 pm

i am probably one who disagreed, musical comedy, but to be honest, my horses are probably the opposite of what you have. they are quick, hurry easily, and for the most part need to be encouraged to take a longer slower stride.

I think what we ultimately are saying is that you need to be prepared to adjust your strategies based on what type of horse you are riding. You probably know the saying, do the opposite .

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby Abby Kogler » Sun Jan 28, 2018 3:38 pm

Interesting thread, thanks.

Although I tend to get big clunky WBs, since I am so tall and there are so many broken down big clunky WBs >;-> I still find that lateral work at the walk improves everything...since most of the ones I get have been dressaged to death, are behind the vertical, heavy on their forehands and are used to being held up and spurred, they are definitely no longer forward thinking. The lateral work at the walk over time seems to reprogram their bodies in to a better posture and then when we start more trot work they are so much better. It improves the canter work exponentially. So many have really terrible canters unless they are being held up in the doubles. I don't even bother to canter them at first. The lateral walk work really improves their canters. YMMV.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby Dresseur » Sun Jan 28, 2018 4:44 pm

I think that we can all agree that lateral work is good for all horses, and that it, along with transitions is how the horse builds the strength and dexterity to be able to eventually show true collection. Lateral work obviously also straightens a horse.

The thing about lateral work, because it's loading a singular hind end, and because it's difficult (for different reasons for different horses), it always sucks impulsion out by the end of a long side. No matter what horse, I always use the short side to refresh the trot. Personally, the only lateral work that I do on a circle is haunches in on the circle (walk piri's, haunches in on circle at trot and all shades of working piri's in canter). I find that with SI on the circle, it is very, very easy for the horses to cheat and just slide out the haunches. No, you can say that this is the rider's responsibility to control the haunches, and I agree with that - but I personally find that the pitfalls are more than what that particular exercise is worth when you can just use the wall.

In terms of strategy, I ride quite a few warmbloods, and obviously, with Andrea, I ride quite a few PRE's and PRE crosses as well as the odd Lusitano cross. I find that all are individuals and each needs something different - I don't find that the warmbloods are more pre-disposed to slowing or that the baroque horses are necessarily tighter. That being said, I do find WB's a bit more inherently lazy, but, then again, when in Andrea's program, forward is addressed first, so by the time I'm allowed to sit on them, she's already made them more forward thinking.

The loosest (think riding a pool noodle) horses that I ride are my own Miro (a PRE), and a Friesan. The very loose horses need to be pushed in the lateral work so that they can't just collapse. I have also been taught to tend toward 4 tracks (more displacement) with those horses so that you don't feed into the ability to just collapse as if you are pushing bend in the 3 track SI.

For the very tight horses (one is a PRE, the others are are warmbloods that just. do. not. bend. - they are allowed a bit slower tempo and bend is paramount (obviously if you lose forward, you refresh that). So, with stiffer horses, I will do SI, volte, back into SI - sometimes several times down the long side so that both hinds keep stroking up even as you work on the bend. Doing that you are working on the inside hind in the SI, and then asking them to switch to the outside for the driving leg for the circle.

Then there are the horses with zero rhythm — one is a PRE, one is an PRE/TB, one is a pure bred quarter horse, and one is a quarter horse/dutch warmblood. For those, forward first, and the slightest hind of wavering from the tempo, the lateral work is abandoned to refresh the tempo and you go back to varying sizes of circles to help them keep the rhythm and drive even as they are bending.

In all the lateral work, I go after the response first. SI (shoulders have to leave the wall), HI (haunches have to come in — so, even if initial attempts at HI are almost counter shoulder in, the haunches have left the wall - bend gets fixed later), SI to R (there has to be some attempt at a bend change and the shoulders have to stay off the wall) HP (the spine has to stay parallel - I'd rather treat baby HP a bit like leg yields to make sure that the horse isn't just collapsing and running through the shoulder.) After the basic responses are being met, then things like bend etc can be addressed. And of course, forward first. You have to feel the chosen hind leg driving up or sweeping under, depending on the movement. And, for bend, you have to feel that the horse yields to the inside leg, not just motorcycles over and leans on your inside leg. I often leg yield into corners to help horses understand this.

In terms of the walking lateral work, I would never do this with a young horse - but the higher trained horses often warm up in simple lateral work before moving on to the trot warmup. It's a low key way to get the horse's listening and off the legs before adding impulsion and power. The young horses are just not connected enough and it tends to stall them out when they need to be thinking forward first.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby khall » Sun Jan 28, 2018 8:41 pm

I do use a good bit of lateral work in the walk. All of my horses start their work in hand first where we go through our training in lateral work. I feel that this is so important to get that flexibility in my big muscled WBs. For me lateral work is more about straightness and flexibility, so we start in the walk in hand with baby stuff then eventually get to where Rip and even his sister Gaila is at where really the combinations are endless as to what they can do. SI HI renvere counter SI HP TOH with all sorts of combinations to play with.

I do use bending lines with lateral work a good bit with counter SI and renvere my favorite exercises. In Spain we did a good bit of HI on the circle both in trot and canter. What I do find is that the maneuverability is intimately tied to the energy of the horse. Once the activity is there, the lateral work is much easier to do for the horse (why I think the PREs in Spain were so easy to do lateral work, they except for one, were very forward thinking horses) I also think with my WBs they are just not as sensitive as a TB or baroque (at least mine are not!) Now again, Anna (my filly's dam) was very sensitive and much more forward thinking than Rip or Gaila ever thought about being. Rip and Gaila go up using their powerful HQs to leap (jumping lines) but find it more difficult to use that power for dressage work. The work Mark taught has made it much easier now with the emphasis on lightness, but Rip will never have that innate fizziness that the PREs I rode in Spain did. That's ok, I have learned so much from the big guy and still am!

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby musical comedy » Sun Jan 28, 2018 8:55 pm

Dresseur wrote:In terms of the walking lateral work, I would never do this with a young horse - but the higher trained horses often warm up in simple lateral work before moving on to the trot warmup. It's a low key way to get the horse's listening and off the legs before adding impulsion and power. The young horses are just not connected enough and it tends to stall them out when they need to be thinking forward first.

My bolding. I would add this applies not just to 'young' horses, but horses young in their training development no matter the age. My thinking is that in order to do TOH, Shoulder-in, Renver, etc. the horse needs to be in light 2nd-levelish collection. That's why these movements are introduced at 2nd level. So, do we want to put a young/green horse into the bit at that level during the walk warmup? I don't. To do these exercises correctly requires bending of the joints, joints that have not been lubricated yet due to not trotting and cantering. Not to mention the potential of ruining the walk on a young horse by putting it together too soon.

I think we all have opinons based on who we've trained with or who we read that we respect. My source is Dr. Clayton. She has stated that a horse needs to trot and canter for a while to get the muscles and joints warmed up enough before doing any lateral or collected work. That makes sense to me. Doing piaffe ground work for a warmup or any exercise that requires engagement of the hocks, on any horse makes no sense to me. I think it's harmful.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby khall » Mon Jan 29, 2018 3:34 am

MC I have to ask how does a horse prepare for collected work if you do not do lateral work for straightening and strengthening? There is a progression when working in hand (WIH) and a warm up period. You don't start with a green horse in true SI or HI or renvere, you start by teaching the horse to shift it's shoulders. In my WIH, I start with all of mine walking forward out and down on one side and then the other. I do not trot before starting lateral work but do trot in hand both straight and in lateral work. You can canter in hand though Rip and I have not quite got to that point yet, close but not quite. I can get him to canter a 10 m circle around me while lunging because his collection is so good at this point in his canter. Rip and Gaila both have worked in this system (one that came from Nuno Olivera) since their start. They have done WIH from the very beginning, with very basic stuff to now the more demanding work. They have done nothing but improve, especially Rip with our concentration of half steps/piaffe since Mark's death. How can it be detrimental when I see such a positive change in the movement and musculature and carriage of my horses? Rip nor Gaila are on any joint supplements. Rip had his stifles injected a few years ago, but last year was clean on his check up. His stifles are much stronger now from his WIH. BTW Hilary Clayton now works with Bettina Drummond who worked with NO for 17 yrs. I saw her ride with Bettina in 2016 in FL. I also saw Bettina work a horse in piaffe for almost 20 min straight, a very advanced horse, and not what I would do. Mark was a big believer in doing hard work and then stretching the horse out, give them a break and then back to the harder work again. So while we do WIH and lateral work it is not without breaks and stretching.

What I learned from Mark was not about levels but addressing the horse, their balance, their strengths and weaknesses. Then choosing appropriate exercises and work (lateral work too) to address the issues. Rip's has been lack of flexibility and his determination to stay down in his chest. It took awhile for him to get strong enough and flexible enough and then for both of us to have an understanding of how to approach this more elevated work. It started with T, H, T, to T, H, RB, T, all the lateral work with emphasis on mobilizing the shoulders (counter SI and renvere) and then to side pass/full pass. Now we are activating the collected walk for piaffe. Also piaffe to H to RB to piaffe. Short periods and after a warm up period in hand. I am extremely pleased with Rip's changes in his work and his mentality.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby Chisamba » Mon Jan 29, 2018 5:14 am

I would be interested in any actual study, ie not opinion, that supports warm up supposedly lubricating joints. What few studies done on warm up support the cardiovascular aspect of a short light warmup to enhance cardiovascular prep for sprint type sports. No evidence it reduces injury, enhances muscles or, I suspect lubricates joints. That's why I would love to see the study. I have a personal interest in warm up studies so hit me with them!

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby musical comedy » Mon Jan 29, 2018 2:22 pm

Chisamba wrote:I would be interested in any actual study, ie not opinion, that supports warm up supposedly lubricating joints. What few studies done on warm up support the cardiovascular aspect of a short light warmup to enhance cardiovascular prep for sprint type sports. No evidence it reduces injury, enhances muscles or, I suspect lubricates joints. That's why I would love to see the study. I have a personal interest in warm up studies so hit me with them!
I don't know if there is anything like a double-blind study on this, but I suspect there are some pretty good scientific 'opinions' on the role synovial fluid plays in lubricating joints. I don't know what kind of proof would satisfy you, and I do not have the time nor inclination to spend much time researching it. We all are pretty set in our thinking so what's the point of arguing and debating unless we have nothing else to do with our time. That's not me.

Here's a quote from another 'opinion' from a very respected professor, Eckart Meyners. I've read the same from Dr. Clayton.

"By warming up, you can improve the nourishment inside the joint cartilage, and after a while, the cartilage layer in the joints thickens.
After moving a joint for five minutes, the cartilage-nourishing synovial fluid increases--a process that is concluded after about 20 minutes. The horse should move at the walk for at least 15 minutes before any actual suppling work starts.”

Eckart Meyners: A professor of sports physiology and movement at the Institute for Leisure Research, Play, and Movement Education at the University of Luneburg, Germany, conducts research on improving athletic performance. Meyners has worked with the German National Equestrian Federation for 25 years and has been instrumental in developing equestrian instruction and rider training methods in Germany.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby piedmontfields » Mon Jan 29, 2018 2:55 pm

On a somewhat different track, one way I came to using lateral work at the walk was to simply get my horse to walk--and not prance. Well, she walks quite consistently now and lateral work helped us get there. I do have to return to this technique if she gets very tense in the walk---such as when we walked by 15 deer yesterday who were not "her deer" (we had passed "her" herd of 9 deer earlier with soft floppy ears and a swinging walk). Go figure.

I appreciate the discussions about approach and type. I definitely have the more fizzy/reactive/tight yet quick noodle sort of horse. I am aware that there are real advantages to *not* having this kind of equine!

p.s. I am also aware that I am not describing using lateral walk work in the warm up very accurately, as before we do that kind of work we just walk for a good 10-15 minutes.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby khall » Mon Jan 29, 2018 5:33 pm

I don't think any of us are saying go straight to work no warm up period at all. I have always started mine out on a free walk situation before beginning "work" even when WIH. Now I may not do 15 min all the time but that is usually because mine are coming from a pasture situation not sitting in a stall to work.

When in Spain things were done a bit differently there. Vivi the instructor and even Raphael Soto would have you start out with the horses put on the bridle and do some lateral work at the walk before stretching them out and down. Raphael said that there must be collection before stretching. Now it may be the difference between those high headed baroque horses and my WB who loves to stretch or it may be how they rode them as opposed to how I ride. But a different approach for sure. Now the horses did stretch during the ride and after the ride in WTC, but not in the beginning.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby piedmontfields » Mon Jan 29, 2018 5:55 pm

khall wrote: When in Spain things were done a bit differently there. Vivi the instructor and even Raphael Soto would have you start out with the horses put on the bridle and do some lateral work at the walk before stretching them out and down...But a different approach for sure. Now the horses did stretch during the ride and after the ride in WTC, but not in the beginning.


Interesting--that is pretty much how I work my mare. She simply does not start out ready to stretch---but then is ready for it after some connected work.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby Ponichiwa » Mon Jan 29, 2018 6:00 pm

Lateral work in the walk can reinforce the rhythm, so it's not usually a risk to the purity of the walk. My sister had a horse that had a very lateral/pacy walk when he was tense, but if you put him in shoulder-fore or slight shoulder-in, his walk rhythm improved dramatically. His impure walk was actually trained in by a rider who was a bit over-enthusiastic in asking for a really big free walk-- he wasn't through enough to increase his overstride in a true 4-beat walk, so he started to pace to get the front foot out of the way quicker. And the rider didn't notice that impurity and rewarded the big walk/punished the smaller walk so bing bang boom, pacing was installed.

I do quite a bit of lateral work in the walk throughout my ride. I may start (after a loose-rein walk of 5-10 min) with a bit of staircase shoulder-in, halfpass, shoulder-in just to get the bending and turning aids sinking in early in the ride, and then I go on to a normal working trot serpentine + canter sprinkled in. The majority of the problems in my canter and trot lateral work show up in the walk (with the exception of the flying change at the end of a halfpass or something) so if I can get the right reaction in the walk it usually generalizes to better trot/canter work with the added bonus of minimal wear/tear on my horse.

I do think that there's nothing as good for the canter as cantering, but the canter halfpass isn't all that different from the walk or trot halfpass for my horse. Canter shoulder-in or counter-shoulder-in may be a different ball of wax. Similarly, you can't really add cadence in the walk so you actually do need to be trotting or cantering to add that in. But for the basics of position control or connection, the walk work really helps.

I've ridden both the old-style tank-esque WB and the hot/fizzy/reactive horse (also WB breeding), and the walk work can help both. However, for my fizzy mare, going large into sedative serpentines can help her brain get back to me if I've gotten her feeling too compressed.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby Chisamba » Tue Jan 30, 2018 5:31 am

Well there are studies supporting that movement results in cartilage nourishment from the synovial fluid however these studies support walking. Hence the increased advice for longer walks more frequently for horses

However , most studies are conducted for humans, and often done experimentally on rabbits or lab animals and extrapolated so horse specific or gait specific studies are difficult to find.

I enjoy discussion, I like reading both sides of opinion, and used to work as a massage therapist at a sport injury rehab clinic. often hard held opinions get in the way of progress and real rehab.

I question the logic to state that loading a joint by doing lateral work in a walk is more stressful than the joint pressure or loading incurred pushing off in trotting, a gait that has suspension, and cantering, a gait that has a jump. Lateral work in trot or canter perhaps, but the walk is a low impact gait, anything in walk is going to have lower impact and stress than trot or canter.

There is a reason why walk is the recovery gait for injury rehab for humans and animals.

So I have no reason to alter my opinion as to the benefits of lateral work at walk.

I am sure you have no reason to respect my opinion so the logic is moot.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby exvet » Tue Jan 30, 2018 2:10 pm

"In all the lateral work, I go after the response first. SI (shoulders have to leave the wall), HI (haunches have to come in — so, even if initial attempts at HI are almost counter shoulder in, the haunches have left the wall - bend gets fixed later), SI to R (there has to be some attempt at a bend change and the shoulders have to stay off the wall) HP (the spine has to stay parallel - I'd rather treat baby HP a bit like leg yields to make sure that the horse isn't just collapsing and running through the shoulder.) After the basic responses are being met, then things like bend etc can be addressed. And of course, forward first. You have to feel the chosen hind leg driving up or sweeping under, depending on the movement. And, for bend, you have to feel that the horse yields to the inside leg, not just motorcycles over and leans on your inside leg. I often leg yield into corners to help horses understand this.

In terms of the walking lateral work, I would never do this with a young horse - but the higher trained horses often warm up in simple lateral work before moving on to the trot warmup. It's a low key way to get the horse's listening and off the legs before adding impulsion and power. The young horses are just not connected enough and it tends to stall them out when they need to be thinking forward first."

This in spades although I'll qualify it and say that even when I use lateral work at the walk as a warm-up I've already 'warmed up' with a forward walk, trot and canter. On my horses that were above second level and well acquainted with the lateral work, I would spend a good 15- 20 minutes on the walk, trot and canter and then would come down to a walk and do some lateral work at the walk to help establish a good response to my leg and to my seat. I wanted to make sure I could put the shoulders and/or hips where I wanted and feel that inside hind coming through where I wanted it too. Then we'd start the more difficult work. On the trail, however, I have used lateral work at the walk even on some of the younger ones when their minds were going to too many 'other' places. It really got them to focus on me and not the 'never ending' monsters that they were convinced were lurking behind every cactus.

In my experience lateral work has always been relatively easy for the welsh cobs and the mustang - more baroque-type horses.

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Re: Strategies for lateral work

Postby musical comedy » Tue Jan 30, 2018 2:42 pm

Chisamba wrote:So I have no reason to alter my opinion as to the benefits of lateral work at walk.
I never ever said anything close to that. If I did, point to it so that I can edit it for clarification. I do lateral work at w/t/c and I think it is beneficial.
Chisamba wrote:I am sure you have no reason to respect my opinion so the logic is moot.
I am sure you have no reason to respect my opinion either, so the point is moot.


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