Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

fergusnc
500 post plus club
Posts: 535
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2015 11:37 pm
Location: NC

Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby fergusnc » Tue Jun 07, 2016 12:18 pm

And why did you choose your yes/no answer? Also, if you do spread, do you have to wait until all the shavings and hots of old hays are totally broken down?

I have heard some folks very opposed over the years, but can't remember why. But also hear lots of non-English rider types say its a no-brainer to do it and very good for grazing/hay fields.

Thanks all!

kande50
Bringing Life to the DDBB
Posts: 1231
Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2015 7:28 pm
Location: Williamstown, MA

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby kande50 » Tue Jun 07, 2016 12:42 pm

fergusnc wrote:And why did you choose your yes/no answer? Also, if you do spread, do you have to wait until all the shavings and hots of old hays are totally broken down?

I have heard some folks very opposed over the years, but can't remember why. But also hear lots of non-English rider types say its a no-brainer to do it and very good for grazing/hay fields.


Hay fields yes, because by the time the hay is dry the worm larvae are all dried up, too.

Pastures no, because I have no confidence that I'm not just spreading worm eggs that will hatch later.

User avatar
Chisamba
Bringing Life to the DDBB
Posts: 2056
Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2015 10:33 pm
Location: New Jersey

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby Chisamba » Tue Jun 07, 2016 1:24 pm

I pile mine up for a year and then spread on pasture. I stay the required fifteen feed away from ground water. I also use it to top dress my veggie garden and fill in low spots

dasher
Greenie
Posts: 31
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2015 2:08 pm
Location: maryland

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby dasher » Tue Jun 07, 2016 4:48 pm

I have a 3 bay composting bin that is aerated. From the time I cover the filled bin and turn on the forced air, it takes about 3 months to have black, completely composted manure. Temps reach 160 deg F and stay there for several days to weeks in parts of the pile. This ensures that all weed seeds and worm eggs are dead. I have a thermometer to check temps in various parts of the bin throughout the process. I then spread on my grazing pastures in the spring and fall.

Quelah
Herd Member
Posts: 259
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2015 12:38 am

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby Quelah » Tue Jun 07, 2016 4:56 pm

I've been doing it every year for the…gosh I think it's 14 years we've had this place. Scratch that, been doing it for 13 years, the first year there weren't enough horses to bother and we didn't have a tractor yet :)

Caveat, we do not have "growing grass" year round. Every year by Sept/Oct this place looks like the surface of Mars, which is a good thing in fire season, to have the pastures nearly down to bare dirt. So every fall we spread the years worth of composted manure and shavings on the pastures and rototill it in and spread seed and go over it with a drag and once the rain starts the pastures are locked until spring. I just use the sacrifice turnouts in the "winter". We grow a LOT of grass, I wish I could have it baled, probably wouldn't have to buy hay ;) My horses are healthy, they have clean fecals.

kande50
Bringing Life to the DDBB
Posts: 1231
Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2015 7:28 pm
Location: Williamstown, MA

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby kande50 » Tue Jun 07, 2016 5:14 pm

Quelah wrote:We grow a LOT of grass, I wish I could have it baled, probably wouldn't have to buy hay ;) My horses are healthy, they have clean fecals.


We do hay the pasture, because we need to mow it anyway, so we wait for good weather and then mow and bale it.

fergusnc
500 post plus club
Posts: 535
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2015 11:37 pm
Location: NC

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby fergusnc » Wed Jun 08, 2016 12:59 am

Kande,
So when do you spread in relation to when you cut the hay fields?

Thanks all!

Also...right now I have my poop pile well outside the fenceline, in our woods, with plans to get our grading guy to get an easier and more cleanly cleared path out to the area....there is some underbrush, and there are trees around. I know compost piles get hot...is there danger of the pile catching on fire or catching other things around it on fire? Right now I don't have a tractor so I can't move it around, etc right now if that is a way to manage heat.
Last edited by fergusnc on Wed Jun 08, 2016 12:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

heddylamar
Herd Member
Posts: 319
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2015 3:04 pm
Location: Maryland

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby heddylamar » Wed Jun 08, 2016 1:37 am

I would contact your local extension office for confirmation.

Here, in Maryland, I was told spreading uncomposted (presuming horses are dewormed) is fine so long as there are no bits of pine shaving. I'm keeping the horses on drylot primarily, so no shavings. Manure from the stalls will be composted with household/garden waste before spreading in the garden or on pasture.

I have never used a tractor to move piles, nor has one caught on fire. Just create 3 corrals: current dump, full/aging, full/aged. Flip with a pitchfork.

kande50
Bringing Life to the DDBB
Posts: 1231
Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2015 7:28 pm
Location: Williamstown, MA

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby kande50 » Wed Jun 08, 2016 9:59 am

fergusnc wrote:Kande,
So when do you spread in relation to when you cut the gay fields?


In the spring before the grass gets too high, and again in the fall after 2nd cutting.

We don't actually have a lot of manure that we can spread because I scrape the pens so the manure ends up with a lot of rocks mixed in, which we can't spread on the hay field because the rocks could damage the mower. So that manure goes on the garden, or gets stockpiled.

I keep the manure that I fork out of the stalls in a separate pile, and that goes on the hay fields.

kande50
Bringing Life to the DDBB
Posts: 1231
Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2015 7:28 pm
Location: Williamstown, MA

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby kande50 » Wed Jun 08, 2016 10:02 am

heddylamar wrote:
Here, in Maryland, I was told spreading uncomposted (presuming horses are dewormed) is fine so long as there are no bits of pine shaving.


Do you know why pine shavings are a problem?

I thought horses were always shedding strongyle eggs, even if they were dewormed regularly or had acceptable fecals (because acceptable is below a certain level rather than worm free)?

fergusnc
500 post plus club
Posts: 535
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2015 11:37 pm
Location: NC

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby fergusnc » Wed Jun 08, 2016 12:21 pm

Do most people have their piles separated? Anywhere I have boarded, I THINK it was always just one big pile. And I guess they flipped it now and then? I asked about combustibility as I remember one boarding barn where you would walk by and feel the heat/see the smoke...but it was on a concrete pad in direct sunlight so not sure if that influenced it. All other manure piles wee hidden away so for all I know they did similar things and I just never saw it.
Our grading guy, who has become sort of a farm mentor and farm hand for us as we learn and get jobs done, mentioned not spreading it on the hay fields (horses don't have access to those) if there was old hay in it and it wasn't fully composted. But otherwise, even uncomposted poop and shavings could be spread...that is why started this thread...not what I had heard at some barns over the years.
Good idea re county extension agent...I forget how much I can ask them about! :-)

User avatar
TeresaA
Herd Member
Posts: 166
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2015 10:45 pm
Location: Atlantic Canada

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby TeresaA » Wed Jun 08, 2016 12:48 pm

We have two manure piles- one for each year. In the fall we spread the composted manure from the year before on the pastures. At that point the pastures are closed to the horses and they are in the 'sacrifice paddock'. I worm regularly anyway because of the deer who bring worms around but I doubt that there are any viable worms by the time we spread it- it's pretty black and 'dirt-like'.

kande50
Bringing Life to the DDBB
Posts: 1231
Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2015 7:28 pm
Location: Williamstown, MA

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby kande50 » Wed Jun 08, 2016 4:43 pm

TeresaA wrote:I worm regularly anyway because of the deer who bring worms around but I doubt that there are any viable worms by the time we spread it- it's pretty black and 'dirt-like'.


Somewhere I read that Strongyle eggs get pushed down into the ground where they over-winter, and then when the ground loosens up in the spring they resurface, hatch, the larvae climb up on the grass and the horses ingest them (which is how their lift cycle works).

I've also heard that they'll dessicate when exposed to sunlight, but I'm not sure if that's just the larvae, or the eggs, too?

I think the larvae are quite fragile, but I don't know about the eggs. I'm pretty sure they produce a lot of eggs, though.

Are there worms that deer get that horses also get?

heddylamar
Herd Member
Posts: 319
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2015 3:04 pm
Location: Maryland

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby heddylamar » Wed Jun 08, 2016 6:20 pm

Fresh shavings will absorb nitrogen in the soil and will leave dead patches in your grass. But, let them compost for a year or more, and it's a great fertilizer.

Multiple manure piles will keep you in good, aged, natural fertilizer. IME, most boarding barns have poor manure/pasture management.

User avatar
TeresaA
Herd Member
Posts: 166
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2015 10:45 pm
Location: Atlantic Canada

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby TeresaA » Sun Jun 12, 2016 4:58 pm

kande50 wrote:
TeresaA wrote:I worm regularly anyway because of the deer who bring worms around but I doubt that there are any viable worms by the time we spread it- it's pretty black and 'dirt-like'.


Somewhere I read that Strongyle eggs get pushed down into the ground where they over-winter, and then when the ground loosens up in the spring they resurface, hatch, the larvae climb up on the grass and the horses ingest them (which is how their lift cycle works).

I've also heard that they'll dessicate when exposed to sunlight, but I'm not sure if that's just the larvae, or the eggs, too?

I think the larvae are quite fragile, but I don't know about the eggs. I'm pretty sure they produce a lot of eggs, though.

Are there worms that deer get that horses also get?



To be honest I don't know for sure about the deer but someone told me the they did and I never questioned it! I did some research and it seems that there isn't transfer. So thanks. :)

Here the frost goes deep into the ground in winter so I would be surprised if they over winter but again not sure. By the time we spend the manure it would be exposed to sun so any eggs/larva would be destroyed. But I also doubt that after cooking for a year or more that they would be alive.

Niki
Novice
Posts: 53
Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2015 12:43 pm

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby Niki » Mon Jun 13, 2016 3:15 am

ARRGGHH i just wrote a long reply and lost it.

I currently don't have yards/stables so don't have any manure compost piles. When we do though i plan to have several on rotation. Where i used to board had a good setup and i plan to do similar. When we do have manure/hay piles its gets relocated to the bare sand areas. We got burnt out 18mths ago and the firefighters put in numerous firebreaks in to try and slow the bush fire. It worked in stopping the fire brilliantly but we are struggling to get that land to recover so any any and all "mulch" products get put on it at the moment to just cover the bare sand. Its also been seeded twice now and is still struggling. I'm currently trying to source some old meadow hay that i can spread on it to cover.

In regards to worms i know i'm doing a crap job of managing the worm burden on my paddocks at the moment so i fecal test and worm accordingly. I currently have 5 horses on about 3-4 acres of sacrifice paddock. The manure is just being broken up and spread instead of collected.

Koolkat
Herd Member
Posts: 294
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2015 2:15 am
Location: Cascade foothills

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby Koolkat » Sat Jul 02, 2016 4:14 am

I can tell you that coyotes love to sit on those big composting manure piles in winter. . . :D

fergusnc
500 post plus club
Posts: 535
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2015 11:37 pm
Location: NC

Re: Composted Manure on Pastures…yes or no?

Postby fergusnc » Mon Jul 04, 2016 1:48 pm

Koolkat wrote:I can tell you that coyotes love to sit on those big composting manure piles in winter. . . :D

:D :D :D :D :D
That would make an interesting photo shoot! :lol:


Return to “Facilities & Transportation”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest